Bells and Whistles

Meaning of Idiom ‘Bells and Whistles’ Bells and whistles are additional features that are added to a product but that are not essential to its basic function; fancy but nonessential add-ons or gadgets. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.,2Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010.,3Spears, Richard … Read more

Behind Closed Doors

Meaning of Idiom ‘Behind Closed Doors’ Behind closed doors means in secret, privately, away from public view or any observation. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.,2Spears, Richard A. McGraw-Hill’s American Idioms Dictionary. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2008.,3Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms]. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.  Want to … Read more

Bet the Farm

Also used: Bet the ranch Sell the farm Meaning of Idiom ‘Bet the Farm’ To bet the farm means to risk everything one’s own on something one is certain of, such as an idea, investment, business venture or bet. 1Heacock, Paul.  Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms]. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010. ,2Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English … Read more

Beg To Differ

Meaning of Idiom ‘Beg to Differ’ To beg to differ means to disagree with someone. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.,2Spears, Richard A.  McGraw-Hill’s American Idioms Dictionary. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2008.,3Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995.  Want to see more videos from Idioms.Online? Subscribe to our … Read more

Before You Know It

Meaning of Idiom ‘Before You Know It’ Before you know it means very soon; almost immediately; suprisingly quickly; before you are even aware of it; when you least expect it. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.,2Bengelsdorf, Peter. Idioms in the News – 1,000 Phrases, Real Examples. N.p.: Amz Digital Services, 2012.,3Ammer, Christine. American … Read more

Be On Your Mettle

Meaning of Idiom ‘Be On Your Mettle’ To be on your mettle means to be determined or forced to prove your ability, especially in a demanding or difficult situation. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.,2Ayto, John.  Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010. See also prove your mettle. Examples Of … Read more

Beyond Your Wildest Dreams

Meaning of Idiom ‘Beyond Your (or one’s) Wildest Dreams’ When something is beyond your wildest dreams it is much better than you imagined, expected, or hoped. 1Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010.  Examples Of Use “Our winner will receive a fully paid vacation beyond their wildest dreams!” “Anthony’s marriage proposal was … Read more

Beat the Bushes

Meaning of Idiom ‘Beat the Bushes (for something or someone)’ To beat the bushes means to search everywhere for someone or something; to search thoroughly. 1Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010.,2Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.,3Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. This idiom … Read more

Beat Around the Bush

Also: Beat about the bush Meaning Of Idiom ‘Beat Around the Bush’ To beat around the bush means to avoid speaking about something or be evasive and overly cautious; to not really say what one means, especially when one feels the topic is too important, upsetting or sensitive, or when one’s knowledge of the subject … Read more

Bee In Your (His/Her) Bonnet, to have a

Meaning of Idiom ‘Have a Bee in Your Bonnet’ To have a bee in your bonnet means to be preoccupied with something and may also mean to talk about it excitedly, angrily, etc., often to excess; to talk about something often because one regards it as very important; to hold an unusual or strange idea or notion. … Read more