Face It

Also: Let’s face it Face the facts Let’s face the facts Look (the facts, truth) in the face Meaning of Idiom ‘Face It’ Face it means to be honest and admit and accept unpleasant facts; accept reality even though it is difficult to accept; look at things as they really are. 1Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English … Read more

Fast and Furious

Meaning of ‘Fast and Furious’ Idiom The idiom ‘fast and furious,’ used as an adjective, refers to something that moves very quickly and is very energetic and lively. Something fast moving and exciting. It can generally be used to mean hurried, especially anything done in a break-neck fashion. Usage “The race was fast and furious, … Read more

Fan the Flames

Used metaphorically since the 1700’s, in phrases such as “fan the flames of discontent,” “fan the flames of insurrection,” or “fan the flames of love.” Meaning To fan the flames is to cause an emotion, especially a negative one, to become stronger or to incite someone to increase negative activities by causing them to become … Read more

Familiarity Breeds Contempt

Meaning A very old proverb, familiarity breeds contempt means that knowing someone (or something) too well makes you overlook the good things about the person and to be more aware of their faults, leading to bad feelings and even scorn. This can apply to not only people but processes, organizations, etc. According to The Oxford Dictionary … Read more

Fall Off the Wagon

Also: On the wagon Off the wagon Go off the wagon Meaning of Idiom ‘Fall off the Wagon’ To be on the wagon means to be abstaining from alcohol or drugs, especially when one has an alcohol abuse problem. To fall off the wagon is to resume drinking after some period of time of abstaining. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of … Read more

Fall Flat

Meaning of Idiom ‘Fall Flat’ To fall flat is to completely fail or to fail to achieve the results expected or desired; to be ineffective; to cause no amusement or interest. 1Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010.,2Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995.,3Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton … Read more

Fair-Weather Friend

Used since at least the mid-1800’s, but probably originated earlier. Meaning of Idiom ‘Fair Weather Friend’ A fair-weather friend is a friend who is with you during the good times but abandons you when things go wrong. In other words, it is the kind of friend who cannot be relied upon during bad times or … Read more

Fair and Square

Meaning of Idiom ‘Fair and Square’ Fair and square means completely fair and just; within the rules of a game or competition; straight, directly and with great accuracy (rare). 1Spears, Richard A. McGraw-Hill’s American Idioms Dictionary. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2008.,2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.,3Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: … Read more

Facts Of Life

Meaning of Idiom ‘Facts of Life’ 1. A euphemism for the facts about human sexual reproduction, similar to the ‘birds and the bees.’ 1Spears, Richard A. McGraw-Hill’s American Idioms Dictionary. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2008.,2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. 2. Unpleasant truths about the way the world works which cannot be changed … Read more

Face the Music

Meaning of Idiom ‘Face the Music’ To face the music means to accept the consequences of one’s actions; to be ready to accept punishment or repercussions for one’s wrongdoings; to confront problems or unpleasantness. 1Spears, Richard A. McGraw-Hill’s American Idioms Dictionary. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2008.,2 Jarvie, Gordon. Bloomsbury Dictionary of Idioms. London: Bloomsbury, 2009.,3Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: … Read more