Pluck Up Courage

Also: Screw Up Courage Meaning of Idiom ‘Pluck Up (one’s) Courage’ To pluck up one’s courage means to oneself to overcome fear or to be brave; to bolster one’s courage. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms]. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.,2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.,3Spears, Richard A. McGraw-Hill’s American … Read more

Play It By Ear

Also: Play Something By Ear Meaning of Idiom ‘Play it By Ear’ 1. To play it by ear means to deal with a situation as it unfolds without a definite plan; to make changes or decisions and proceed gradually as a situation demands, without planning out one’s responses in advance; to improvise.  Want to … Read more

Put Up Or Shut Up

See shut up. Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Up Or Shut Up’ When someone is told to put up or shut up it means they should act on what they have been saying, or stop talking about it; stop complaining about things your not willing to do anything about. 1McCarthy, Michael. Cambridge International Dictionary of Idioms. … Read more

Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is

Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is’ To put your money where your mouth is means to do something rather than just talk about it; to take actions that support your opinion, statements or position; to use your own money in support of something you say your support. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American … Read more

Put Someone Up

Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Someone Up’ To put someone up is to provide a place for them to stay, usually temporarily; to provide lodgings. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Examples Of Use “We’ll put you up in the barracks for tonight,” said the sergeant. “We’ll get your permanent quarters … Read more

Put Up With

Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Up With (someone or something)’ To put up with someone or something means to tolerate or endure without complaining. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Examples Of Use “I’ve put up with your nonsense long enough. It’s time you found a new place to stay.” … Read more

Put On

Meaning of Idiom ‘Put On’ 1. To dress oneself in clothing, jewelry, or to place eyeglasses or contact lenses on one’s eyes, etc. 1Brenner, Gail Abel. Webster’s New World American Idioms Handbook]. Wiley, 2003.,2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Usage note: This meaning can apply to many items, such as cosmetics, or … Read more

Put Someone Off

Also: Put off someone Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Someone Off’ 1. To cause someone to dislike someone or something; to repel or repulse someone. 2. To persuade someone to delay acting; to discourage someone by making them wait, especially in order to avoid hurting their feelings. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms]. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, … Read more

Put Off Something

Also: Put something off Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Off Something’ To put off something means to postpone it; to delay something; to hold for a later time. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms]. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.,2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms]. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013 Usage As suggested by the variant listed above, … Read more

The Pits, to be

Meaning of Idiom ‘The Pits’ To be the pits means to be a very unpleasant, undesirable, or unfortunate thing (situation, circumstance, etc). Examples Of Use “Going to school is the pits. I think I’m going to skip class today.” “I forgot to pay my water bill so they cut off my water!” “That’s the pits,” … Read more