Put the Pedal to the Metal

To put the pedal to the metal has long been used in regards to driving a car, especially in action movies involving car chases. It means literally to press a car’s gas pedal all the way to the floor but figuratively, it means to drive very fast. If you are in a hurry you might … Read more

Put in One’s Two Cents Worth

Also: Two cents Put in one’s two cents Add one’s two cents (worth) Give one’s two cents (worth) Put one’s oar in Stick one’s oar in Meaning of Idiom ‘Put in One’s Two Cents (Worth)’ To put in one’s two cents (worth) means to give one’s opinion even when it is not asked for. Two … Read more

Put Someone Out To Pasture

Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Someone Out to Pasture’ To put someone out to pasture means to force them to stop working because they are considered too old to be effective; to cause someone to retire. Want to see more videos from Idioms.Online? Subscribe to our YouTube channel! Examples of Use “My grandfather refused to be … Read more

Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is

Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is’ To put your money where your mouth is means to do something rather than just talk about it; to take actions that support your opinion, statements or position; to use your own money in support of something you say your support. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American … Read more

Put Someone Up

Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Someone Up’ To put someone up is to provide a place for them to stay, usually temporarily; to provide lodgings. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Want to see more videos from Idioms.Online? Subscribe to our YouTube channel! Examples Of Use “We’ll put you up in … Read more

Put Up With

Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Up With (someone or something)’ To put up with someone or something means to tolerate or endure without complaining. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Want to see more videos from Idioms.Online? Subscribe to our YouTube channel! Examples Of Use “I’ve put up with your … Read more

Put On

Meaning of Idiom ‘Put On’ 1. To dress oneself in clothing, jewelry, or to place eyeglasses or contact lenses on one’s eyes, etc. 1Brenner, Gail Abel. Webster’s New World American Idioms Handbook]. Wiley, 2003.,2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Usage note: This meaning can apply to many items, such as cosmetics, or … Read more

Put Someone Off

Also: Put off someone Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Someone Off’ 1. To cause someone to dislike someone or something; to repel or repulse someone. 2. To persuade someone to delay acting; to discourage someone by making them wait, especially in order to avoid hurting their feelings. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms]. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, … Read more

Put Off Something

Also: Put something off Meaning of Idiom ‘Put Off Something’ To put off something means to postpone it; to delay something; to hold for a later time. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms]. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.,2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms]. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013 Want to see more videos from Idioms.Online? Subscribe … Read more

Put Your (or One’s) Best Foot Forward

Meaning of Idiom ‘Put One’s Best Foot Forward’ To put your best food forward is to do your best or present yourself in the best possible way; to make the best impression you can. Examples Of Use “If you want this promotion you’re going to have to put your best food forward. There are three other people … Read more