Up to One’s Ears

Also: Up to one’s eyes/eyeballs Up to one’s neck Meaning of Idiom ‘Up to One’s Ears (in/with something)’ To be up to your ears in something means to be extremely busy or preoccupied with it or to have too much of it. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.,2Pare, May. Body Idioms and … Read more

Up The Creek (Without a Paddle)

Also: Up a Creek Up Shit Creek Meaning of Idiom Up the Creek (Without a Paddle) To be up the creek means to be in trouble, in a serious predicament, or an awkward position. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013., 2Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995.,3Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of … Read more

Up in The Air

Up in the air has been used as a figurative idiom in English since at least the 1920’s. Meaning of Up in the Air When something is up in the air, it means that it is undecided, uncertain, or unresolved. This expression refers to plans, solutions to problems, disagreements, etc. Examples Of Use “Our Christmas … Read more

Up In Arms, about something

Up in arms’ started as a literal expression in the sixteenth century which became a more figurative idiomatic expression during the seventeenth century. This old cliche is still quite familiar today. Meaning of being ‘Up in Arms’ To be up in arms means to be angrily protesting something in a quite public manner, or to … Read more