Wrong Side of the Tracks, the

Also: From the wrong side of the tracks Living on the wrong side of the tracks Right side of the tracks Meaning Of Idiom ‘The Wrong Side of the Tracks’ The wrong side of the tracks is the poorer side of town; the part of town where people live who are considered of a lower … Read more

Writing On the Wall

Also: Handwriting on the wall The writing is on the wall Meaning of Idiom ‘Writing on the Wall’ Writing on the wall is a warning or sign that something unpleasant or unfortunate is going to happen. 1Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010.,2Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995.  Want … Read more

Wrap Yourself in the Flag

Used as an idiom since at least the early 1900’s. Meaning of Wrap Yourself in the Flag According to the Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, to wrap yourself in the flag is to make an excessive show of your patriotism, especially for political ends. This is mostly an American idiom. We often use this phrase to refer to … Read more

Wouldn’t Hurt A Fly

Also: Wouldn’t harm a fly Can’t hurt a fly Couldn’t hurt a fly Would never hurt a fly wouldn’t hurt a flea Meaning of Idiom ‘(someone) wouldn’t hurt a fly’ When it is said that someone wouldn’t hurt a fly, it means that they are very gentle and harmless and that they would never hurt … Read more

Without Further Ado

Also: without more ado Meaning of Idiom ‘Without Further Ado’ The idiom without further ado means without more talk, activity, ceremony, etc.  1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.,2Jarvie, Gordon. Bloomsbury Dictionary of Idioms. London: Bloomsbury, 2009.,3Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Usage The phrase without further ado is often used in formal settings, … Read more

With Flying Colors

A phrase used since the 17th century. Meaning With flying colors means with easy and outstanding success. To succeed at something extremely well.  Want to see more videos from Idioms.Online? Subscribe to our YouTube channel! Examples Of Use “I was worried about my medical exam but I passed with flying colors.” “I hardly studied … Read more

Whole New Ball Game, a

Also: A different ball game Meaning of Idiom ‘A Whole New Ballgame’ A whole new ball game is a completely changed situation or set of circumstances. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.,2Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010.  Want to see more videos from Idioms.Online? Subscribe to our YouTube … Read more

Who Cares?

Meaning of Idiom ‘Who Cares”‘ When someone says “who cares?” they mean I don’t care; it doesn’t matter to me; it doesn’t bother me; I am not interested (in something). 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.,2Brenner, Gail Abel. Webster’s New World American Idioms Handbook. Wiley, 2003. Examples Of Use “The principal made me … Read more

When the Chips are Down

Idioms reveal the popularity of a perennially popular activity throughout the world and especially in the U.S. It’s not baseball or billiards. It’s gambling. It is surprising how many common idioms come from gambling. When the chips are down is just one of many American idioms. They didn’t spring up only after Las Vegas became a gambling … Read more