Leopard Can’t Change Its Spots, a

Also: A leopard doesn’t change its spots You can’t change a leopard’s spots A Tiger can’t change its stripes Meaning of Idiom ‘A Leopard Can’t Change Its Spots’ A leopard can’t change its spots means that a person cannot change their inner character or nature, especially if it is bad. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary … Read more

Writing On the Wall

Also: Handwriting on the wall The writing is on the wall Meaning of Idiom ‘Writing on the Wall’ Writing on the wall is a warning or sign that something unpleasant or unfortunate is going to happen. 1Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010.,2Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995.  Want … Read more

Turn the Other Cheek

Meaning Turn the Other Cheek: to do nothing to retaliate when attacked or insulted by another; to accept an attack passively; to respond to an attack or insult in a humble and mild way. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms. Cambridge University Press, 2010.,2Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010.,3Ammer, Christine. American Heritage … Read more

Take As Gospel

Also: Take as the gospel truth Take for gospel Accept as gospel Meaning of Idiom ‘Take (something) as Gospel’ To take something as gospel means to absolutely believe it to be true. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.,2Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010. See also gospel truth. Examples Of Use … Read more

Skin and Bones (nothing but)

Also: Just skin and bones Meaning of Idiom ‘Nothing but Skin and Bones’ To be nothing but skin and bones means to be extremely thin and emaciated.  1Pare, May. Body Idioms and More: For Learners of English. United States?: Mayuree Pare, 2005., 2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Usage This idiom can be used to … Read more

See Eye to Eye

Meaning of Idiom ‘See Eye to Eye’ To see eye to eye with someone means to agree with them; to think alike; to have similar opinions or viewpoints. 1Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010.,2Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995. Examples Of Use “Frank and I could never see eye to … Read more

Salt of the Earth, the

Meaning of Idiom ‘The Salt of the Earth’ To be the salt of the earth means to be a very good, honest, worthy and reliable person or persons. 1Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010.,2Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995.  Want to see more videos from Idioms.Online? Subscribe to our … Read more

Rob Peter to Pay Paul

Meaning of Idiom ‘Rob Peter to Pay Paul’ To rob Peter to pay Paul means to borrow money from one person or institution to pay back money owed to another person; to take from one person to give to another; to shift money or resources without accomplishing any gain or benefit. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: … Read more

Gospel Truth

Meaning of Idiom ‘The Gospel Truth’ The gospel truth is the absolute, unquestionable truth. 1Ayto, John. Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms. Oxford: Oxford U, 2010.,2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. See also take as gospel. Examples Of Use “I’m telling you the gospel truth, John is having an affair with his secretary.” “Some … Read more

Go the Extra Mile

Also: Walk the Extra Mile Meaning of Idiom ‘Go the Extra Mile’ To go the extra mile means to do more than is expect or is needed; to make a greater effort than needed. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.,2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.  Want … Read more