Without Further Ado

Also: without more ado Meaning of Idiom ‘Without Further Ado’ The idiom without further ado means without more talk, activity, ceremony, etc.  1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.,2Jarvie, Gordon. Bloomsbury Dictionary of Idioms. London: Bloomsbury, 2009.,3Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Usage The phrase without further ado is often used in formal settings, … Read more

Stick In Your (or one’s) Throat

Also: Stick in your craw. stick in your gizzard. Stick in your gullet. Meaning Stick in your throat: Refers to something that is impossible to accept or that continues to annoy you; to be unable to say something or to have great difficulty saying it. All the variations are interchangeable but the more colorful variants … Read more

Spick and Span

Meaning of Idiom ‘Spick and Span’ To be spick and span means to be very neat, clean, and organized; to be perfectly maintained and looking as if new.  1Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995., 2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013., 3Bengelsdorf, Peter. Idioms in the News – 1,000 Phrases, Real Examples. N.p.: … Read more

Much Ado About Nothing

Meaning of Idiom ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ Much ado about nothing refers to excessive excitement or fuss something that is of little importance. 1Bengelsdorf, Peter. Idioms in the News – 1,000 Phrases, Real Examples. N.p.: Amz Digital Services, 2012.,2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Examples Of Use “News of the president’s injury … Read more

Flotsam and Jetsam

Meaning of Idiom ‘Flotsam and Jetsam’ Flotsam and Jetsam meaning something similar to odds and ends, especially in regards to forgotten or unwanted objects. The idiom may also refer generally to garbage or anything unwanted, including people, objects, concepts, ideas, etc. Sometimes, as well, people such as the homeless, refugees, waifs, etc. are pejoratively referred to as … Read more

At Loggerheads

Meaning of the Idiom ‘at Loggerheads’ To be ‘at loggerheads’ means to be engaged in a quarrelsome argument; strongly disagreeing. This somewhat formal idiom tends to carry the connotation of being unable to reach an agreement. Usage “The union has been at loggerheads with management on the benefits package for months now.” “Peace talks are … Read more