Take Off

Meaning of Idiom ‘Take Off’ 1. To leave or go away. Also expressed ‘take oneself off.’ 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms]. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Usage note: Also expressed as a command similar to beat it or buzz off, as in the example “Take off. I don’t have time for your complaints … Read more

Leave Holding the Bag

Also: Be Left Holding the Bag Meaning of Idiom ‘Leave (someone) Holding the Bag’ To leave someone holding the bag is to abandon them so that they are forced to bear the responsibility for something or the consequences of your actions. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms]. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. ,2Bengelsdorf, Peter. Idioms in the … Read more

Take French Leave

Meaning of Idiom ‘Take French Leave’ To take French leave is to leave without getting permission or without informing anyone; to leave a gathering without saying goodbye to the host; to quit a job without giving notice. Usage This expression is better left unused, as it may be seen as a slur toward the French. … Read more

Elvis Has Left the Building

Elvis has left the building, unlike most idioms, is of recent origin. It does, of course, refer to Elvis Presley, but since he is dead, it cannot refer to him literally. What does this common expression mean and how did it come about? Want to see more videos from Idioms.Online? Subscribe to my YouTube channel! … Read more

Buzz Off

Meaning of Idiom ‘Buzz Off’ To buzz off means to leave; go away. 1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.,2Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010. Usage Buzz off is usually spoken as a command, similar to beat it. Examples: “You’re not going to believe what Bobby said to the new … Read more

Beat It

Meaning of Idiom ‘Beat It’ To beat it means to leave immediately; go away [commad] 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010. 2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Usage Beat it is still a slang term and it usually used as an order to tell someone to go away quickly, … Read more