Chime In

Meaning of Idiom ‘Chime In’

To chime in means to enter into a conversation other people are having, especially by interrupting to agree or repeat; to inject a comment or opinion into a conversation; to join a conversation to express agreement. 1Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms]. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.,2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.

In regards to music, to chime in means to join in by adding a harmony or in unison.


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Usage

Although this idiom can mean to interrupt, it tends to have a neutral to positive connotation and does not necessarily express rudeness.

Chime in with: be in agreement with; to combine in a harmonious way.

Examples Of Use

“Everybody in the room was chiming in to defend him.”

“When Todd and Kim were arguing over who would go for lunch, Patel chimed in that he would pick up lunch instead.”

“I’m going to call Francis and see if he can help us out,” said Julie. “Yeah, I really think you should,” chimed in Oscar.

“Feel free to chime in if you have an idea,” said the team leader.

“I asked Bob to chime in with his idea.”

“His views tend to chime in with the rest of his party.”

“The decor chimes in perfectly with the bold colors of the room.”

Origin

A chime, in this idiom, refers to a bell or set of bells and the sound made by them. The idiom was first used, in regards to music, in the late 1600s and extened into general use in the early 1700s. heritage

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Sources   [ + ]

1. Heacock, Paul. Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms]. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2010.
2. Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.