Make A Fuss

Also:
Make a fuss about (something)
Make a fuss over (something)

Meaning of Idiom ‘Make a Fuss’

To make a fuss means to complain and cause a needless commotion or put on a public display. 1Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995.2Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.

Usage

This idiom is often put as ‘to make a fuss about/over something’ as in “don’t make a fuss about Jim’s being late today. His mother is in the hospital.”

Examples Of Use

“I hate to make a fuss but this remote doesn’t work for my TV. Can I return it?”

“Look, don’t make a fuss. I’ll return your tools tomorrow.”

“The press is making a fuss over access to the courtroom but the judge wants this case kept out of the public.”

“You’re making a fuss about nothing. Mary didn’t come to your party because she didn’t feel well, that’s all.”

Origin

The word fuss has been used to mean complain since around 1700. The present idiom dates from about 1800. 3Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.

More Idioms Starting with M

More Fuss Idioms

More Make Idioms

 

Sources   [ + ]

1. Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995.
2, 3. Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.