Shut Up

Meaning of Idiom ‘Shut Up’

1. Stop speaking. Often spoken as a command (imperative). (Early 1800s)

Usage note: When shup up is used as a command, it is rude and abrupt.

2. To shut someone up means to cause them to stop speaking.

3. Close completely, especially windows or shutters. (Early 1500s)

4. Imprison or lock inside a building, room, or other enclosure. (c. 1400) 1Ammer, Christine.  American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms]. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. 

Examples Of Use

“Shut Up! You don’t know what you’re talking about.”

“I need you to shup up right now while I concentrate.”

“Peter is telling everyone you are a liar,” said Jerrold. “Yeah? Well tell him to shut up. He barely even knows me,” said Andy.

“Peter is telling people I’m a liar. I’m going to shut him up,” said Andy.

“He thinks he can tell me what to do. I told him to leave me alone or I’ll tell his wife about him and his secretary. That’ll shut him up!”

“Make sure all the window are shut up tight. There a storm coming.”

“The shutters are shut up the for the winter. Is there anything else we need to do before we leave?”

“We always shut the dog up in his kennel at night.”

“If I don’t testify, they’re going to shut me up in cell for ten years.”

Origin

See usage dates above.

In regards to speaking, this idiom alludes to shutting one’s mouth, with up acting as an intensifier, as it often does.

See also put up or shut up.

More Idioms Starting with S

More Shut Idioms

More Up Idioms

 

Sources   [ + ]

1. Ammer, Christine.  American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms]. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.