Talk About

Meaning of Idiom ‘Talk About (Something)’

The expression talk about is used to indicate a very good example of something; something that is remarkable; something that is significant; absolutely the case. 1Spears, https://amzn.to/2CEGuCz Richard A. McGraw-Hill’s Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. McGraw-Hill, 2006.,2Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995.,3Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.


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Usage

While ‘to talk about something’ normally means to discuss something, this idiom is not meant to indicate that the speaker actually wishes to discuss something, but simply to indicate that the speaker thinks a particular situation or thing is noteworthy as a good example of something.

Examples are the best way to understand this difficult and common English idiom.

Examples Of Use

“You’re going to love Daniel. Talk about the salt of the Earth!”

“Dave thinks I’m selfish? Talk about the pot calling the kettle black!”

“Wow, talk about ugly paintings. This thing is hideous!”

“Talk about rude! He didn’t even say hello. He just helped himself to a beer.”

“Talk about beautiful! Did you see that woman at the bar?”

“Pauly said what? Talk about lying! Every word out of his mouth is a lie.”

“That meeting was so boring. Talk about a snoozefest!”

“When I went to Egypt I got to see the pyramids. Talk about huge.”

Origin

This idiom was in use for much of the 20th century but its origins are unknown. The allusion could be construed as a shortened way of saying ‘if you want to talk about (something), then here is a very good example (of it). In practice, however, it is simply a way of calling attention to something, or to emphasize it.

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Sources   [ + ]

1. Spears, https://amzn.to/2CEGuCz Richard A. McGraw-Hill’s Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. McGraw-Hill, 2006.
2. Kirkpatrick, Elizabeth M. The Wordsworth Dictionary of Idioms. Ware: Wordsworth, 1995.
3. Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.