You Said a Mouthful

Meaning of Idiom ‘You Said a Mouthful’

To say a mouthful means to say a great deal or to say something very important. When someone says “You said a mouthful” they mean “you said something very important or meaningful.”

Less often, a long statement.  1Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms]. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. 2Spears, Richard A. McGraw-Hill’s American Idioms Dictionary. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2008.


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Usage

Although the precise meaning of this idiom is different than the similar idiom you can say that again, it is often used in a similar way, to express complete agreement. It is also used to commend someone for their insight.

You said a mouthful idiom meaning

Examples Of Use

“When you said this was going to be our biggest year yet, you said a mouthful. Business is booming!”

“Richard is a very talented actor,” said Rose. “You said a mouthful,” said Arthur. “He’s going to be famous!”

Origin

This idiom alludes figuratively to the maximum amount of food a mouth can hold. It has been used since the late 1700’s. 3Pare, May. Body Idioms and More: For Learners of English. United States?: Mayuree Pare, 2005.,4Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms]. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.

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Sources   [ + ]

1, 4. Ammer, Christine. American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms]. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013.
2. Spears, Richard A. McGraw-Hill’s American Idioms Dictionary. Boston: McGraw Hill, 2008.
3. Pare, May. Body Idioms and More: For Learners of English. United States?: Mayuree Pare, 2005.